Q. E. Mother****ing D.

Sometimes I imagine I’m a well-spoken, intelligent and more-or-less well adjusted individual.

And then I hear myself try to explain the plot of Invasion of Time to somebody.

lostinhistory:

qichi:

minutemanworld:

Tea leaves collected from Boston harbor the morning after the Boston Tea Party. 
Label reads:
“Tea that was gathered up on the Shore of Dorchester Neck on the morning after the destruction of the three Cargos at Boston December 17, 1773.”

i’m so pleased that this means someone during the event was like “yeah this is probably gonna be historically interesting” and just ran out there with, like, what, a net? some cloth? fishing around in the fucking bay to collect tea to put in a bottle? you go, buddy

Good job, anonymous 18th century person.  Your commitment to historic preservation pleases me.

lostinhistory:

qichi:

minutemanworld:

Tea leaves collected from Boston harbor the morning after the Boston Tea Party. 

Label reads:

Tea that was gathered up on the Shore of Dorchester Neck on the morning after the destruction of the three Cargos at Boston December 17, 1773.”

i’m so pleased that this means someone during the event was like “yeah this is probably gonna be historically interesting” and just ran out there with, like, what, a net? some cloth? fishing around in the fucking bay to collect tea to put in a bottle? you go, buddy

Good job, anonymous 18th century person.  Your commitment to historic preservation pleases me.

(Source: hoover.archives.gov)

As Arnold points out, there is an otherwise inexplicable shift in direction in the Piccadilly line passing east out of South Kensington. “In fact,” she writes, “the tunnel curves between Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations because it was impossible to drill through the mass of skeletal remains buried in Hyde Park.” I will admit that I think she means “between Knightsbridge and Hyde Park Corner”—although there is apparently a “small plague pit dating from around 1664” beneath Knightsbridge Green—but I will defer to Arnold’s research.

But to put that another way, the ground was so solidly packed with the interlocked skeletons of 17th-century victims of the Great Plague that the Tube’s 19th-century excavation teams couldn’t even hack their way through them all. The Tube thus had to swerve to the side along a subterranean detour in order to avoid this huge congested knot of skulls, ribs, legs, and arms tangled in the soil—an artificial geology made of people, caught in the throat of greater London.

London and Its Dead

i read shit like this and think what could my imagination possibly have to add

like how do i write something about london that’s weirder than london already is?

(via weunderstandthelights)

I am taking the Piccadilly line to the airport tomorrow and wow, do I have something to think about now.

(via ursulavernon)

(Source: saxifraga-x-urbium, via ursulavernon)

HIS GREATEST moment of Doctor Who fanboy-fantasy realization thus far came when he was called upon for the first time to operate the TARDIS, the homely 60s-era London police box that serves as the Doctor’s vessel for time travel. As he stood surrounded by set technicians explaining how to use it, Capaldi says, “I had to be very patient and not say to them, ‘I know exactly how to operate it. You don’t have to tell me a thing. Moon Man is here.’

inuis:

fantomeheart:

The only acceptable birthday cake

so when you blow out that candle you’ll be killing that charmander happy birthday u sick fuk

inuis:

fantomeheart:

The only acceptable birthday cake

so when you blow out that candle you’ll be killing that charmander happy birthday u sick fuk

(via thegaydoctor)